Address:
578 Royal Esplanade, Manly, Q 4179

Phone:
+61 7 3396 8666

Email:
reception@rqys.com.au

Know Your Marine Radio Tips

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #1

Repeater channels can sometimes double the range of your VHF marine radio.

There are three in the Moreton Bay Gold Coast Seaway area.

VHF Ch 82 Mt Stayplton [ southern Moreton Bay to Southport]

VHF Ch 21 Cape Moreton [ outside Moreton and North Stradbroke Is and

VHF Ch 81 Mt Glorious [Northern Moreton Bay]

If you are traveling to Mooloolaba and further there is another repeater station for use in that area VHF Ch 80

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #2

When planning your next trip on the Bay ‘log on’ with Marine Radio Manly on VHF Ch 73 or your local VMR or Coast Guard. If you are not logging on, please call and ask for a ‘radio check’. That way you know, if you do get into trouble, your radio work.

Remember VHF Ch16 is for emergencies only. Monitor but use only in emergencies

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #3

If you are venturing into the shipping channels remember to monitor VHF Ch 12 or Ch 16. At night, its always a good idea to have AIS capabilities so you can become visable to large ships or anyone else with AIS.

AIS is available as an app for your smartphone or tablet via apps such as ‘Boat Beacon’

Remember apps draw a lot of power so make sure you have a backup power supply

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #4

When making a ‘Mayday ‘ call on VHF Ch 16, there is a minimum amount of information that we need. Make your call clearly calling ‘Mayday, mayday, mayday, this is Sandbar, Sandbar, Sandbar I m located at….. [visual location or GPS location…., I have 4 people on board and we have struck a submerged object’ We need name of vessel, location, number of people on board and the problem. Also the registration number of your vessel if time permits.

If you get no reply, repeat the call until you do

STAY CALM!

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #5

If you hear a Mayday call on your marine radio and no one answers, take down the details of the vessel calling and reply to them on the same channel using the term ‘Relay Mayday’

‘Relay mayday, relay mayday, relay mayday, Sanbar, Sandar, Sanbar, is located at …[visual location or  GPS location]…. They have 4 people on board and have struck a submerged object. Their registration number is AB123Q.’ Then wait for a reply. If no reply repeat. If you are in the vicinity of Sandbar advise them that you are proceeding to assist during the ‘relay mayday’.

Repeat the ‘Relay mayday if you get no response

STAY CALM

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #6

MARINE RADIO MANLY NOW USES SMS NOTIFICATIONS

As you may be aware, Marine Radio Manly,Coast Guards Mooloolaba,Tin Can Bay and  Sandy Straits use the Marine electronic Radio Log (M.e.R.L.) to record all communications. This now has the capacity to automatically generate SMS’s to the given mobile phone number.
SMS’s will be sent when:-
1. A vessel becomes “overdue”.
2. Vessels using the “Boat Beacon App” on log on or off.
3. When a vessel using “Boat Beacon App” enters a different control area (e.g. A vessel leaving Moreton Bay for Sandy Straits, on activating “Boat Beacon” will be automatically logged on to Marine Radio Manly, on leaving Moreton Bay will automatically logged on to C.G. Mooloolaba and when in C.G. Tin Can Bay’s and Sandy Straits area automatically logged on with them – SMS’s will be sent with that advice). If you get an SMS from a station with the code starting with “TNG”, you should be on land. “TNG406” and other “TRG” site are purely used for testing and training and are NOT monitored.

NOTE: These SMS’s are sent from random Telstra mobile phone numbers – PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THESE NUMBERS.

The Radio Operators wish to encourage the use of their “Sea Watch” service.

It is easy to log on by:-
1. Radio VHF 73 with your Manly Number.
2. Automatically using “Boat Beacon AIS” app (Please advise your Boat Beacon ID or it will not happen).
3. Or via your mobile phone web browser, make “qf6.org/vkq447.php” a “favourite” and follow the prompts (enter your Manly No. and vessel registration once and it will remember you). This allows you to log on/off and make changes, with instant confirmation

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #7

When ‘logging on’ or when you are passing on vessel details, use the phonetic alphabet to spell names and registration numbers. B,D,E C,G V,T,P’s can sound the same on a marine radio resulting in wrong vessel names and registrations being passed on.

Give your information slowly over the radio to give the operator receiving time to write it down.

Remember, speak slowly when passing on information over a marine radio

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #8

The Phonetic alphabet

Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliett, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-Ray, Yankee, Zulu

  1. 0. Zeeroh, 1. Wun, 2. Too, 3. Tree, 4. Fower, 5. Fife, 6. Six, Seven, 8. Ait, 9. Niner,

. Decimal, .stop, – dash

SPEAK SLOWLY WHEN TRANSMITTING DETAILS OVER A MARINE RADIO

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #9

What Marine Radio Channels are available in The Central Moreton Bay area

Ch 16 Emergency only Channel

Ch 67 Backup Emergency Channel

Ch 73 Calling Channel for ‘Logging on’

Ch 21 Repeater Channel used outside Moreton and North Stradbroke Is.

Ch 81 repeater Channel used in the Southern Bay to Gold Coast

Ch82 Repeater Channel used in the Northern Bay to Bribie Island

Ch 63 VKR Water Police Channel use only in extreme emergencies

YOU CAN ALSO LOG ON USING YOUR MOBILE PHONE FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL JACK KENNEDY 0418675180

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #10

MAYDAY calls are made,  ‘ when a ship of person using it is in grave or imminent danger and requests immediate assistance’

PAN PAN calls are made when ‘ a station sending it has a very urgent message to transmit concerning the safety of a ship or aircraft or the safety of a person’

SECURITE calls ‘indicate that a station using it is about to transmit a message concerning an important navigational or weather warning.

ALWAYS SPEAK SLOWLY AND CLEARLY WHEN TRANSMITTING DETAILS OVER A MARINE RADIO

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #11

SQUELCH CONTROL

This control allows the operator to to stop the constant and annoying internally generated background noise from the receiver in the absence of an incoming signal. On VHF marine radios, it is generally an adjustable control. To adjust, turn the knob clockwise until the noise disappears. The correct setting is when the noise disappears. If you turn the knob too far, it will desensitize the receiver which may prevent the reception of weak signals.

DO NOT TURN THE SQUELCH CONTROL TOO FAR CLOCKWISE AS YOU MAY

LOSE WEAK SIGNALS AS A RESULT

 

KNOW YOUR MARINE RADIO TIP #12

FAULTS IN MARINE RADIO EQUIPMENT

Regular inspection of the antenna, transceiver and battery power supply, will minimize the likelihood of faults occurring at sea.

Faults can be easily divided into three categories.

Faults occurring in the antenna system

Faults occuring in the transceiver and

Faults occurring in the battery power supply

CALL FOR A RADIO CHECK BEFORE YOU GO OUT ON THE WATER TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MARINE RADIO IS WORKING. WHILE YOUR ARE CALLING ‘LOG ON’

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